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Weight Loss Clincs Clearfield UT

See below for weight loss clinics in Clearfield that provide access to weight loss programs, weight loss products, diet pills, weight management, and low-calorie regimen diets as well as advice and content on healthy lifestyles and fitness centers.

Dr. Marie Green
(801) 476-8885
5582 South 1750 East
Ogden, UT
Services
Yeast Syndrome, Wellness Training, Weight Management, Substance Abuse, Stress Management, Psychotherapy, Preventive Medicine, Pain Management, Nutrition, Neurofeedback, Mind/Body Medicine, Medical Intuition, Hypnosis/Hypnotherapy, Homeopathy, Healthy Aging, Guided Imagery, Geriatrics, EFT, EMDR, Cognitive Therapy, Coaching, Breathwork, Brain Longevity, Biofeedback, Bach Flower Essences, Aromatherapy, Addiction
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided By:
Boot Camp 4 U
(801) 825-0653
570 E 1700 S
Clearfield, UT
 
Intermountain Fitness
(801) 217-3323
1649 E 1400 S
Clearfield, UT
 
Li'l Audrey's Health Spa USA
(801) 399-4949
441 20th St
Ogden, UT
 
Medical Weight Loss Clinic
(801) 393-3586
1890 N 400 E
Ogden, UT
 
Four Pillar Fitness
(801) 295-2377
395 N 200 W
Bountiful, UT

Data Provided By:
Therapies For Health
(801) 698-2447
466 N Main St
Clearfield, UT
 
McKay-Dee Hospital Nutrition Consultants
(801) 387-7539
4401 Harrison Blvd
Ogden, UT
 
Lifetime Health & Body Makeover
(801) 334-8226
460 2nd St Ste B
Ogden, UT
 
MD Diet of Ogden
(801) 393-3586
1890 N 400 E
Ogden, UT
 
Data Provided By:

Baby Weight Be Gone!

For nine months your weight slowly creeped up and up, but you didn’t mind because you were carrying a precious little bundle of joy. And when you read the charts explaining where all the weight comes from—for example, increased blood volume and, of course, the baby—you probably thought that once you delivered the baby, most of the weight would be gone, right? Not quite.

Out of curiosity, I asked the nurses to weigh me after my second baby was born. Get this: I had delivered an 8-pound baby but somehow only weighed 5 pounds less than I did before he was born. Crazy, right? That’s the way it goes.

Even if most of your newly acquired weight doesn’t instantly melt away, it can come off fairly painlessly. This is one of those situations where the adage “prevention is the best medicine” rings true. If you’re pregnant, now’s the time to be sure you don’t overindulge while “eating for two.” Follow your doctor’s or dietitian’s advice regarding limiting weight gain by eating a healthful diet consisting of a variety of all the food groups and going easy on excess fat-, sugar-, and salt-laden foods.

If you’ve already met your newest family member, there’s plenty you can do to get yourself back to your fighting weight:

Move it or lose it: As soon as your healthcare provider gives you the go-ahead, try to take a daily walk. You’ll burn calories while getting an invigorating dose of fresh air during an otherwise tiring day. For an extra boost, bring the baby along in a stroller or chest carrier. The extra weight will help you burn more calories.

Get some zzzz’s: “Studies show that lack of proper sleep can cause cortisol and insulin levels to surge, which can impede your weight loss,” explains Rachel Brandeis, MS, RD, an Atlanta-based dietitian who specializes in nutrition for women with multiple pregnancies.

Breast-feed if...

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Fat Camps Are Out, Healthy Lifestyles Are In

Today’s weight loss camps are not the boot camps of yesteryear. By focusing on long-term healthy lifestyles and the triggers that make us eat too much, modern camps offer more than a diet jump-start.

If your vision of a weight loss camp includes drill sergeant fitness instructors and celery and carrot sticks, think again. Most of today’s weight loss camps focus heavily on making a healthy lifestyle achievable for the long term. “The idea should not be for the client to return over and over but to take the new lifestyle skills home,” explains Jim White, RD, an American Dietetic Association spokesperson. “The biggest indicator of success is longevity.”

So how do you find a camp that’s going to do more than help you shed a few pounds in the short term? The most important step is to ask questions. Adam Martin, fitness director for Hilton Head Health Weight Loss Spa in South Carolina, says an effective weight loss camp combines fitness, nutrition, meal planning, and behavioral changes in its program.

White advises potential campers to look for programs that feature registered dietitians and personal trainers certified by professional organizations like the American College of Sports Medicine. “Camps should also address emotional eating,” White stresses. “They need to get to the root of the weight loss problem. Is it boredom? Stress? Are you really hungry?”

White says camps need to offer realistic programs that clients can take home and incorporate into their own busy lifestyles. A lot of camps offer classes on how to prepare simple and healthy meals. A good camp ensures that exercise is fun and is often followed up with a relaxing massage or yoga session. “The approach should be holistic,” he says.

So if it’s not boot camp, how will the pounds slide off, you may wonder? According to Marsha J. Hudnall, program director of Green Mountain at Fox Run in Ludlow, Vermont, people often need a place where they can zero in on their goals for a week or more. “If people get away from the distractions of daily life and focus on themselves, they can consider what’s really getting in the way of a healthy lifestyle at home,” she says.

“We ask our campers to consider the top three obstacles that are getting in the way of eating healthfully,” Hudnall adds. Those obstacles are different for everyone but may include regularly skipping breakfast or overeating at night. Hudnall says that while behavioral changes are not rocket science, they can be hard to implement at home without support. “Women especially tend to put everything and everybody else first and themselves last,” she explains. That’s one reason Green Mountain offers a lot of take-home materials to its guests, as well as opportunities for them to keep in touch once camp is over.

“It’s hard to create the camp environment at home,” White says. &...

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Normal-Weight Obesity

More than one half of Americans fall within a healthy weight range. But the number on the scale doesn’t tell the whole story. That’s because 50% of the people in the acceptable weight range are not considered healthy because fat accounts for too much of their body weight.

Even if your weight is considered normal, excessive body fat (roughly 20% or more for men and more than 30% for women) isn’t healthy, say experts. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota found that normal-weight obesity creates a greater risk of a person developing heart disease or metabolic syndrome, the latter often leading to the development of type 2 diabetes.

How do you know whether you’re carrying too much fat on your frame? “There are several ways to measure body fat. Some are very sophisticated, so their main use is in research,” says Abel Romero-Corral, MD, of the Mayo Clinic. However, you can use a bioimpedence scale that not only gives your body weight in pounds but also displays the percentage of body fat. Or a dietitian or another trained professional can measure your level of body fat using calipers, an instrument that grasps the skin folds of the arms, back, and waist to measure and estimate the amount present.

Losing weight through dieting doesn’t always address the problem, says Romero-Corral. “Diet alone can make a person lose fat but often they lose muscle as well, which could be harmful. For that reason, exercise must ...

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