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Child Nutritionists College Park MD

This page provides useful content and local businesses that give access to Child Nutritionists in College Park, MD. You will find helpful, informative articles about Child Nutritionists, including "Promoting Good Nutrition in Kids: Dos and Dont's". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in College Park, MD that will answer all of your questions about Child Nutritionists.

Nhsw, Inc.
(301) 891-8887
6495 New Hampshire Ave
Hyattsville, MD
 
Deb Friedman
(240) 593-6237
n/a
Takoma Park, MD
Company
Deb Friedman
Industry
Herbalist, Healthy Lifestyle Coach, Nutritionist
Specialties & Therapies
Therapies : Botanical Medicine, Herbal Medicine, Holistic Medicine, Nutritional Counseling, Herbal Medicine, Family Medicine, Natural Health, Nutrition Education, LGBT Healthcare
Insurance
None
Professional Affiliations
American Herbalists Guild

Data Provided By:
Sss Nutrition And Dietetic Care Services, Inc.
(301) 588-4440
8630 Fenton St
Silver Spring, MD
 
Richard L Atkinson Jr, MD
(202) 877-2058
100 Irving St NW # Eb4109
Washington, DC
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided By:
Van Saxton Hubbard, MD
(301) 594-8827
6707 Democracy Plaza Rm 631 6707 Demorcacy Blvd,
Bethesda, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Nhsw, Inc.
(301) 891-8887
6495 New Hampshire Ave
Hyattsville, MD
 
Sss Nutrition And Dietetic Care Services, Inc.
(301) 588-4440
8630 Fenton St
Silver Spring, MD
 
Richard John Calvert, MD
(301) 846-1246
Hfs-452 8301 Muirkirk Road
Laurel, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
National Integrated Health Associates
(202) 237-7000
5225 Wisconsin Avenue, Northwest, #402
Washington, DC
Services
Women's Health, Stress Management, Preventive Medicine, Nutrition, Meditation, Internal Medicine, Healthy Aging, Bio-identical HRT
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided By:
Ashok Ray Prasad, MD
(248) 476-9040
Washington, DC
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Sinai Grace Hosp, Detroit, Mi; Huron Valley -Sinai Hospital, Commerce Twp, Mi
Group Practice: Oakland Affiliated Internists

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Promoting Good Nutrition in Kids: Dos and Dont's

In the April issue of Today’s Diet & Nutrition, Joanna Dolgoff, MD, author of Red Light, Green Light, Eat Right, offered tips for helping parents talk about weight with their children and teach them about good nutrition and weight management. Here, Dolgoff offers more dos and don’ts for parents:

1. Do breast-feed. Of all the strategies for preventing childhood obesity, the only one with scientific evidence of efficacy is breast-feeding. The odds of becoming overweight are 20% to 30% lower in children who are breast-fed. Interestingly, these effects are delayed, as they are best seen in preadolescents and adolescents. 

2. Don’t introduce solids until the age of 6 months. There is a common misconception that cereal helps a baby sleep through the night, but there is no evidence of this. 

3. Do let your child watch you enjoying healthy foods. Children always like to eat what others are eating.

4. Do not worry if your child doesn’t eat three well-balanced meals with foods from all the food groups each day. Some days will be better than others. As long is it all balances out over the course of a week or two, your child likely has a healthy diet.

5. Do try experimenting with healthy versions of your child’s favorite foods, such as baked chicken nuggets, homemade pizza with low-fat cheese, or baked frozen French fries. You will be surprised that many children don’t notice the difference.

6. Do serve a variety of foods. Allow your child to develop a taste for more than just chicken nuggets and French fries.

7. Do not give your child a liquid nutritional supplement, such as Pediasure, without consulting your pediatrician. These supplements fill your child’s stomach with liquid calories, leaving no room for solids. Your child gets full from the Pediasure and develops even less interest in eating solid foods. 

8. Do let your child assist with food preparation in whatever ways possible. Your child can accompany you to the supermarket where you can discuss all the fruits and vegetables. Point out the ones that you particularly like and ask your child which he likes. Give your child choices: Should we buy peas or carrots? Apples or mangos? Make a fuss out of picking a new fruit or vegetable of the week for the family to try. Let your child help cook dinner or sit with you while you cook. A child is much more likely to eat a healthy food that she has helped to prepare. 

9. Do pay attention to food presentation. You want to make the meal seem like fun. Arrange vegetables into the shape of a face on the plate. Make pancakes in the shape of a snowman or even Spongebob Squarepants. Cut sandwiches into different shapes like hearts or diamonds.

10. Do serve a fruit or a vegetable with each meal. Encourage your child to take at least two bites so they get used to eating these foods.

11. Do encourage your children to eat slowly since it takes time to realize that you a...

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